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20120701
20120731
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the managed index funds, gus, good to have you on the program, thank you for joining us on the program. >>> thank you. >> so we got the jobs numbers out on friday, the unemployment rate at 8.2%, the number of jobs created, another big disappointment. 80 thousand jobs, what did you expect? and what do you think it tells us about the economy right now. >> well, the adp number came out the day before, people were very excited about the number, which was up. in fact when the labor department number came out it was really off a little bit from where people had previously expected it to be, a little bit of disappointment. it didn't surprise us. we expected weakness throughout the summer, we think the economy will start to improve in the latter part of the year, perhaps the latter part of the third quarter and fourth quarter. >> and as the economy has gotten worse, the federal reserve says we will be there if more stimulus is needed. we saw global moves, the bank of england and china, what is your outlook on the global economy? and is it all up to the feds at this point? >> well, i think it n
strategy what about the u.s. and the impact? my conversation with one of the most powerful women in the world. the international monetary fund christine lagarde, talking about america. >>> and a nation of wusses, what current politicians are afraid to say. why nobody is making the tough changes they need to make, "the wall street journal report" begins right now. >> here is a look at what is making news as we head into a new week on wall street, we had another disappointing jobs number to report, the economy add'd just 80,000 jobs in the month of june, well below expectations. the unemployment rate held steady at 8. %. it made the economy the weakest for job growth in two years, adding just 75,000 per month, a third of the jobs created in the first quarter. well, that drove the markets down at the open on friday after hitting their highest level since early may during the holiday shortened week. >> bob i do mond is out after he resuned after the bank admitted to fixing a key interest rate. i can mond is an american, largely credited with expanding barclay's revenue. >>> ford was
, j.p. morgan's strategist, thank you for joining us. >>> thank you. >> what is your take on the earning season so far? tell me how your clients are viewing it and what people are doing with their money these days. >> okay, well, clients are nervous about money these days, they're hearing europe slowing, china, big announcements. it turned out to be a lot better than expected. if you look at sort of bottom line numbers, about 60% are beating on earnings. that is a really good statistic, but only from the% are beat -- 40% are beating on revenue and margins. >> why is it? >> slowing. >> do you still see a risk of partners, adversity, what are they doing? >> actually, i was just in boston this week, they are very, very cautious, they look at europe. they don't think things have improved. the fiscal cliff is a big discussion now. d china, they're frustrated because the stock market has continued to really push towards new highs. >> interesting, even though the backrop is what -- somewhat weak, the market is -- >> i think something that is a good leading into care, the last 20
in this environment? joining me is j.p. morgan's chief u.s. equity strategist. what's your take on the earnings season so far? tell me how your clients with being here and what people are doing with their money these days? >> clients are really nervous about earnings because they were hearing europe slowing, china, big profile announcements and it turned out to be a lot better than expected. if you look at bottom line numbers, about 60% are beating on earnings. that's a really good statistic. only 40% are beating on revenues which means companies are not making revenue targets but they're beating on margin. >> why is that they're not making revenue targets? things are slowing down? >> things slowed, yeah. >> do you still see the kind of risk adversity on the part of investors today? what are they doing? >> absolutely. investors, i was just in boston early this week. they are very, very cautious because they look at europe. they don't think things have improved. they see the fiscal cliff as a big topic of discussion now and then china data has been disappointing. they're very nervous and then frustrate
is terrific. thanks for joining us today to talk about this important conversation. so, first let me get your thoughts on tarp. you say, tarp, the popular perception that i had warned git mer about that it was little more than a massive transfer of wealth to undeserving wall street executives. do you think it was necessary and do you think it worked? >> i think it was necessary in that we were heading off into a terrible potential global apocalypse because of the importance of these giant super mega banks. if they started to fall, they could bring the entire economy down with them. we needed some sort of response, it wasn't just tarp, of course. it's the trillions of dollars from the federal reserve and other programs. that did help to stop us going over that cliff. while it was successful in that aspect. it was a whole lot of other things tarp was supposed to do, get lending back in the economy, help struggling homeowners, the bill doesn't pass if it doesn't make those promises and it failed on every one of those promises, so it worked for the banks, but failed significantly for everyone els
that get it. and they are using the debt debate and the ceiling as trying to steer congress in a completely other direction. and while i certainly understand the frustration of the american people in -- and everybody else, i think it -- it is going to take turning this battleship a huge direction. and perhaps it is going to take a crisis to get this country to change. >> what about the fed meetings? we had the minutes release from the federal reserve meeting this week. a few said that more stimulus is probably needed. will we see more easing from the fed, and how effective will that be, given that rates are already at rock bottom levels? >> you know it is funny, i view it as three phases of addressing probl problems, first it is the rhetoric phase, a lot of jaw boning and gum flapping. next phase is monetary policies, certainly there was a lot of that with zero interest rates and quantative easing. the next thing is policy action, we wanted it here and in europe, haven't seen that yet much. >> and what advice do you have for investors? should they change in the middle of all of this uncerta
moves in terms of stimulus. policy makers agree they might need to take more action if the u.s. economy loses momentum, but there were few hints about more quantitative easing, which disappointed the markets. and united airlines set to buy 150 new jets made by boeing. the planes will be delivered beginning next year. >>> another earnings season is here. will it lead to a summertime swoon or sweet surprise for the markets? joining me now is jack ablin. jack, nice to have you on the program, welcome. >> thanks, maria. >> let's talk earnings here, the season is underway for the second quarter. the mood seems fairly pessimistic, what are your expect taxs for earnings? >> analysts expectations as a whole are calling for about negative 2% earnings decline this quarter, first quarter, about 16 we're seeing losses, mostly on the back of big declines in commodity prices, so at least going into this quarter, expectations are pretty low. >> expectations are low and i think they are still coming down. do you think the earnings estimates are going to continue coming down for the rest of the year? >>
agreements this week, most importantly bailout funds can now be used to directly stabilize struggling european banks without adding to the country's debt. a move that should help spain and italy skyrocketing borrowing costs. >>> also, countries seeking bailout money would not have to follow stringent austerity rules which could allow for more growth. there was also a move towards a joint banking supervisory body. but as always, the devil is in the details. many of which have yet to be worked out. still, the move sent stocks sharply higher at the open on friday closing out a rough quarter on a strong note. more signs of a rebound in the housing market, meanwhile. new home sales hit a high rising 7.6%. 369,000, well above economist's expectations. >>> don't feel bad if you're driving an old klunker. americans are holding on to their cars longer. the average age is now 11 jeers old. partly due to a slow economy, partly due to more reliable cars. >>> google getting into the game, introducing a tablet called the nexus 7. it measures 7 inches and will cost $199. the nexus is more likely to
barofsky an author of a new book. "bailout." thank you so much for joining us. >> great to be here. >> the book is terrific and thanks for joining us today to talk about this important conversation. so first let me geyour thoughts on t.a.r.p. in your book you say "t.a.r.p., the popular perception that i had warned geithner about, that t.a.r.p. was little more than a massive transfer of wealth from taxpayers to undeserving wall street executives." do you think the program was necessary and do you think it worked? >> i think it was necessary, in that we were heading off of, you know -- into a terrible potential global apocalypse. because of the importance of these giant super mega banks. that if they started to fall, they could bring the entire economy down with them and we needed some sort of response. and it wasn't just t.a.r.p., it was the trillions and trillions of dollars from the federal reserve and other programs. working together that did help stop us from going over that cliff. and while it was successful in that aspect, there's a whole lot of other things t.a.r.p. was suppo
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)